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Astronomers capture images of this binary system as the asteroid 1999 KW4 flies across the Earth

The 1999 KW4 asteroid passed the Earth at a safe distance of about 3.2 million miles. Space rock is far from enough to pose a threat to our planet, but this distance is enough for astronomers to capture the image of this "special visitor."
 Astronomers capture images of this binary system as the asteroid 1999 KW4 flies across the Earth
Asteroid 1999 The KW4, unlike many other space rocks, is actually a binary system consisting of two separate space rocks: an asteroid about a mile in diameter and a small satellite that orbits it. The satellite is about 0.25 miles in diameter.

The European Southern Observatory has released an image of a binary system taken by the Very Large Telescope (VLT). The image of the dragonfly is the actual photograph taken by the scientist, and the image on the right is the artist's imagination of the artist about what they might look like.

"These data, combined with all the data obtained through the International Asteroids Early Warning Network (IAWN) activities on other telescopes, are critical to assessing effective deflection strategies when it is found that asteroids collide with the Earth," European Southern Observatory astronomer Olivier Hainaut said in a statement. “In the worst case, this knowledge is also essential for predicting how asteroids interact with the atmosphere and the Earth's surface, so that we can mitigate damage in the event of a collision.”






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